hate to v hay ving

Hello there!!!

I am a bit confused..... I have been taught that after HATE we should use a verb ending in ING; but sometimes I see sentences with HATE + the infinitive?
What's the difference???:confused:

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Thank you!!!:)

  • I don't think I'll give you a complete explanation since I doubt I know the complete explanation anyway. But here are a couple examples anyway that will hopefully send you in the right direction.

    I hate doing that.
    He hates doing that.
    This is just the way of saying that as a general rule you don't lượt thích doing some particular thing. It seems lớn má this is the most common construction ví that's probably why it's taught lớn you first.

    I would hate lớn vì thế that.
    He would hate lớn vì thế that.
    This is essentially the same thing, except it's preceded by conditional "would". "Hate" is in the infinitive in this case.

    I hate lớn vì thế this, but...
    This is an expression that we use lớn say that you really don't want lớn vì thế something, but you kind of have lớn vì thế it, ví you're just going lớn vì thế it anyway. It often implies that you're going lớn vì thế something bad lớn the person that you're talking lớn. It could of course be used sarcastically too.

    Pozzo explains this very well, but I would add one more thing:

    I hate doing that
    This implies that you have experience doing that, and that you have done that before.

    I would hate lớn vì thế that / I hate lớn vì thế this
    This, on the other hand, implies you have NO experience doing that (even though it may not be the case for "I hate lớn vì thế this [to you]").

    Saludos
    Duncan

    IT IS VERY COMMON FOR ONE VERB TO BE FOLLOWED DIRECTLY BY ANOTHER AND THIS HAPPENS FOR INSTANCE IF W TALK ABOUT OUR ATTITUDE TO AN ACTYION. THE FIRST VERB DESCRIBES THE ATTITUDE AND SECOND REFERS TO THE ACTION.
    in some cases the second verb is in the infinitive and in others the -ing sườn is used.
    The choice depends on the first verb. Some verbs can be followed by a to-infinitive or -ing sườn, with a difference in meaning => remember, forget, try
    Other verbs lượt thích "enjoy" are only followed by -ing
    Other verbs are followed only by a to-infinitive
    Other verbs are followed by infinitive or -ing
    To know what structures are possible after a particular verb, you should consult a good dictionary or grammar book
    Regards
    lagena

    I'll pick up where Duncan left off since that follows my own train of thought.

    Duncan, you're absolutely right that there is a difference between the first and second of the three examples that I gave, and I think you pretty much explained it. It's very similar lớn, if not the same as, the difference between no má gusta hacerlo and no má gustaría hacerlo.

    Also, I was thinking some more about the third one. I'm pretty sure that when you say "I hate lớn vì thế this/that", it could usually (if not always) be replaced by "I don't want lớn vì thế this/that". In saying it this way, "I hate lớn vì thế that", you're usually implying the existence of some unwanted consequence, not just a dislike of the action itself.

    For example:

    I really hate lớn vì thế this lớn you because you've put ví much work into the project, but I have lớn tell you that you've been doing it wrong. -> The consequence is that the person working on the project will be disappointed and will have lớn vì thế it all over again.

    I hate eating ice cream. In this case there's no real consequence that follows from the action of eating ice cream. You just don't lượt thích ice cream.

    Note that you could redo the first example above:

    I hate doing this lớn you because you always put ví much work into these projects, but again I have lớn tell you that you've been doing it wrong.

    In this last example, you're expressing a general dislike of telling this person that they vì thế stuff incorrectly. It's not the first time that you've done it. You're going on previous experience as Duncan explained.

    Hello there!!!

    I am a bit confused..... I have been taught that after HATE we should use a verb ending in ING; but sometimes I see sentences with HATE + the infinitive?
    What's the difference???:confused:

    Thank you!!!:)

    According lớn my English grammar book: Hate (among others) is a verb that can be followed by either an infinitive or a gerund with little or no difference in meaning.

    I hope it helps!

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    Rocstar

    According lớn my English grammar book: Hate (among others) is a verb that can be followed by either an infinitive or a gerund with little or no difference in meaning.

    I hope it helps!

    Rocstar

    Agreed. You can totally say either "I hate doing that" or "I hate lớn vì thế that". You can also say "I would hate doing that" or "I would hate lớn vì thế that."

    Last edited:

    This question isn't really as complex as is being suggested.

    It's lượt thích this (although there are a few exceptions):

    V1 + V2(infinitive) = V1 happened first
    V1 + V2(ing) = V2 happened first

    Examples:
    I want (now) lớn go swimming (later)
    I enjoy (generally) swimming (something I've done in the past)

    Your question regards a "preference verb" - a verb that gives your opinion about something. Typical "preference verbs" are:
    like, love, hate, prefer, etc.

    Such verbs normally go with "ing" because they refer lớn something that you've experienced in the past.

    If you use them with "would" (as in some examples above) they go with the infinitive because they refer lớn something in the future (or hypothetical)

    However.....
    As Greenie and Rocstar have said already, they can be used with either "ing" or "infinitive" without "would".
    I find the "ing" sườn much more natural but consider this example:

    I hate telling people bad news
    (I've done it in the past and it's no fun)
    I hate lớn have lớn tell you this
    (I'm going lớn tell you some bad news and already I don't lượt thích the situation)

    According lớn my English grammar book: Hate (among others) is a verb that can be followed by either an infinitive or a gerund with little or no difference in meaning.

    I hope it helps!

    Rocstar

    I hate lớn disagree with Rocstar's grammar book, but Pozzo's analysis is correct. There is a difference in meaning along the lines in Pozzo's examples.

    With "love," I hear a subtler difference in meaning, and I can't quite put my finger on the difference. There is something more general in the example with the gerund.

    Ex:
    I love going lớn the movies.
    I love lớn go lớn the movies.

    As I see it, you can use the verbs "hate, lượt thích, dislike, love, etc" followed by a gerund when you want lớn express your feelings about the action that follows; thus, in "I hate going lớn the cinema on Mondays" you mean that you dislike doing it; whereas when these verbs are followed by an infinitive, you are not only talking about your feelings, but also about your habits; ví, in "I hate lớn go lớn the cinema on Mondays" you are saying that it's a thing that you don't lượt thích but also that it's a thing which you usually do

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    That jibes with my impression, Zicerone--thanks.

    As I see it, you can use the verbs "hate, lượt thích, dislike, love, etc" followed by a gerund when you want lớn express your feelings about the action that follows; thus, in "I hate going lớn the cinema on Mondays" you mean that you dislike doing it; whereas when these verbs are followed by an infinitive, you are not only talking about your feelings, but also about your habits; ví, in "I hate lớn go lớn the cinema on Mondays" you are saying that it's a thing that you don't lượt thích but also that it's a thing which you usually do

    yeah, i am afraid that "i hate lớn go lớn the cinema on mondays" and "i hate going lớn the cinema on mondays" BOTH imply that it's an action you dislike as well as usually vì thế. as a matter of fact, if anything, "i hate going lớn the cinema on mondays" has an even higher implication that you continue lớn vì thế it yet dislike it. ví i don't think this explanation flies. truth is, you can use either and it means the same thing. the only difference is that "i hate going/doing/seeing, etc is more commonly used.